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20120928
20121006
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >> woodruff: and we close by returning to a conversation with tonight's debate moderator, our own jim lehrer about his book on past presidential debates. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: in just a few hours, president barack obama and former massachusetts governor mitt romney will take the stage at the university of denver's magness arena for the first of three election debates. tonight's encounter, moderated by the "newshour's" own jim lehrer, is to focus on domestic policy. the first half of the 90-minute face-off will be spent on the number one issue for most voters this year: the economy. joining us for the debate, and here with us now to preview what to expect tonight are two familiar faces syndicated columnist mark shields and "new york times" columnist david brooks. gentlemen, welcome. th
'm again ifil. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. tonight's debate will be moderated by our own jim leerer and will start a little over a minute from now, from the magness arena. >> after the debate we'll talked to arrow shapiro and scott horsily in denver, and christina bellantony. >> woodruff: you can follow along online on our live stream and live plog. two very quick thoughts from mark and david. mark, it come downs to this. >> in a rare race it's become increasingly a referendum on the challenger rather than the incumbent. can the challenger mitt romney make this a referendum on the president. >> who has the toughest job? >> romney. maybe jim lehrer. format i love. much more demanding on jim but better for us. >> ifill: we're looking forward to what jim has to say tonight. it's a big night and we'll go to the convention hall and hoar from our own jim lehrer. >> lehrer: good evening, from the ma nag mess arena in colora. i welcome you to the first of the 2012 presidential debates between president barack obama, the democratic nominee, and former massachusetts governor, mitt romney, the
to relish the chance to go directly at the president during the debate moderated by the "newshour's" jim lehrer. >> mr. president, you're entitled to your own airplane and your own house, but not your own facts. look, i've got five boys. i'm used to people saying something that's not always true, but just keep on repeating it and ultimately hoping i'll believe it. i'm sorry, jim, i'm going to stop the subsidy to pbs. i'm going to stop other things. i like pbs, i love big bird. actually like you, too. but i'm not going to... i'm not going to keep on spending money on things to borrow money from china to pay for. >> woodruff: for his part, president obama did not bring up romney's now-famous "47-percent" comments, his record at bain capital, or his stances on immigration or abortion. but the candidates did cover a range of other issues, sparring repeatedly over tax cuts. the president singled out a bipartisan analysis that concludes the romney plan would cost $5 trillion over 10 years. >> i'm not looking for a $5 trillion tax cut. what i've said is i won't put in place a tax cut that adds
pbs' coverage of the first presidential debate, moderated by jim lehrer. mark shields and david brooks will join judy and me for real time analysis at 9:00 p.m. eastern time. but our coverage begins at noon online, when we begin live stream coverage with interviews on policy, a politics preview and a live blog throughout the debate itself. the conversation continues after the debate ends at a google-plus hangout with undecided battleground state voters. >> woodruff: there are new developments today in the benghazi consulate attack as congressional committee leaders turn up the heat on the state department and there are reports that the u.s. is closer to targeting suspected perpetrators. margaret warner has more. warner: the attacks that killed american ambassador chris stevens and three colleagues in benghazi was first described by u.s. officials as an eruption of anger at an anti-islam film. the obama administration has since reversed that appraisal and now calls it a well coordinated terrorist attack. but questions have mounted over the shifting assessments. and today two republican
by the pbs newshour's own jim leer. republican mitt romney made his way westward from boston with a rally in denver planned for this evening. president obama was in henderson, nevada, getting ready. last night he tried to lower expectations for himself at a rally in las vegas. >> i know folks in the media are speculating already on who is going to have the best zingers. >> you are! i don't know about that. who is going to put the the most points on the board. >> you are! no, no, governor romney is a good debater. i'm just okay. >> woodruff: by contrast a prominent romney supporting was out hyping his candidate's debating skills. new jersey governor chris christie on cbs's face the nation yesterday. >> i've seen mitt romney do this before. he's going to come in wednesday night and lay out his vision for america. he's going to contrast what his view is and what the president's record is. and the president's view for the future. this whole race is going to be turned upsidedown come thursday morning. >> woodruff: like wise president obama's senior advisor david pluf offerd this assessment on
on the doubleheader and our own jim lehrer will appear in a segment with cbs's bob schieffer on the program "sunday morning" this weekend to talk about the history of presidential debates. >> suarez: and to the last installment this week in our series of reports about america's dropout problem. tonight, we take a second look at a story about life outside the classroom. we head back to st. petersburg, florida, where one boy's enthusiasm for journalism has helped shine a light on problems, while brightening his future at the same time. it's part of our "american graduate" project. this is how 14-year-old de'qonton davis starts every school day in st. petersburg, florida. he wakes up early and walks his 12-year-old sister terrijana six blocks to the bus stop. to the casual eye, his family's neighborhood seems pleasant and sunny. but on closer look, the scars of poverty and a lingering recession become apparent-- high unemployment, foreclosures, and some of the highest crime rates in the city. last month, de'qonton says he began making it a point to walk with his sister, after a man she didn't know rep
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)